Group for Experimental Methods in Humanistic Research
at Columbia University

lit-mod-viz

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Literary Modeling and Visualization Workshop is a research cluster located at the nexus of narratology, data science, and sociology of literature. We are particularly interested in advancing formal and exploratory methods for computational literary analysis in dialog with the rich theoretical traditions of the humanities. Moderated by Dennis Yi Tenen, Department of English and Comparative Literature (Columbia).

A random sample of the projects from this collective includes:

embodied-space-lab

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Walking can be a mode of analysis that encompasses text, body, and place. The Embodied Space Lab incorporates mobile methods of reading and map-making into philology and historiography. In the dialectic between body and space we trace apparent vectors of power, technology, gender, class, and ethnicity and draw critical cartographies: ways of seeing and reflecting on an embodied and embedded world. Moderated by Moacir P. de Sá Pereira, (Columbia Libraries) and Manan Ahmed, Department of History (Columbia).

A random sample of the projects from this collective includes:

knowledge-design-studio

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As scholars, students, and archivists, we would like to imagine—study, build—knowledge architectures that answer to humanistic ideals. Our proximity to the worlds of journalism, library science, and publishing gives us an opportunity to affect meaningful change in redressing inequalities of access, to envision the future of books and literacy, and to experiment with new modalities of human–text interaction. Moderated by Durba Mitra, Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality (Harvard) and Kaiama Glover, French (Barnard).

A random sample of the projects from this collective includes:

epistemic-action

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The Epistemic Action research cluster unifies our advocacy and activism efforts. We proceed with the belief that certain theoretical commitments—deconstruction, decolonization, or historical materialism—necessitate corresponding practical engagement. To be effective, critique must be followed by concerted action. And action requires new modalities of scholarship: critical making, workshops, tech training camps, community support, and legal reform. Moderated by Alex Gil (Columbia Libraries) and Madiha Choksi (Columbia Libraries).

A random sample of the projects from this collective includes: